General

General (91)

Duane Monlux is new Bellevue coach

Written by Administrator - Tuesday, 21 September 2010

Duane Monlux, Head Coach at Dickinson State for the past nine season, is the new Head Coach at Bellevue.

Monlux had a record of 232-167-2 at Dickinson State, and the Blue Hawks won three regular season and three tournament championships in the Dakota Athletic Conference. They finished 30-19 in 2010.

Monlux earned a BS at Dickinson State, and played football, baseball, and basketball there. He was a two-time All-American in football; in 1995, he led the nation in kickoff return average (33.7 yards per return). He ranks second in Dickinson State football history for touchdowns scored in a career (43) and points scored in a career (262). After graduation, he played indoor football for four seasons. He was also an assistant football coach at Dickinson State.


Followup on the 2010 MLB draft

Written by Administrator - Monday, 13 September 2010

Here is how the NAIA players taken in the 2010 MLB draft did this summer.

Joseph Staley - C, Lubbock Christian, 8th round, Giants - Played 33 games for the AZL Giants, batted .250, five home runs, 25 RBI. He will be spending the Fall in the Instructional League in Scottsdale, AZ.

Kawicka Emsley-Pai - C, Lewis-Clark State, 10th round, Diamondbacks - Played 42 games with the Yakima Bears of the short-season Class A Northwest League, batted .167.

Tyler Knigge - RHP, Lewis-Clark State, 12th round, Phillies - Pitched 30 1/3 innings for the GCL Phillies (ten appearances, four starts), had a record of 0-3, 5.04 ERA, 27 strikeouts. One of his teammates with the Phillies was Pat Murray (1B, Lewis-Clark State, 34th round, Phillies). Murray played 52 games, batted .313, with two home runs, 26 RBI.


New bat restrictions for the 2011 season

Written by Administrator - Wednesday, 25 August 2010

The NAIA is following the NCAA's lead in requiring that only bats conforming to the "Coefficient of Restitution” standard will be legal for use, starting with the 2011 season.

Coefficient of Restitution bats are less lively than existing aluminum bats, and are intended to produce the same batted-ball speed as a wooden bat.

Now, what does this mean?

First, any aluminum bats you now have in your closet are illegal. You may as well ship them off to a baseball-playing Third World country such as Cuba, Nicaragua, or Guatemala.


Page 12 of 12